Liverpool
-
Liverpool
Ship icon
Black Watch
Ocean
14
nights
from
£1,399
Per Person
Manager's Pick

The Fjords of Greenland

  • Traditional cruising
  • Small and friendly
  • Couples cruising

Pricing

<div class="ph w-hidden-small w-hidden-tiny w-row" style="width:100%;"><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Date<br></div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Ship</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Departure Point</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Arrival Point</div></div><div class="poc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">From Price</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">&nbsp;</div></div></div><div class="w-dyn-list" style="width:100%;"> <div class="w-dyn-items"> <div class="pricingtable w-dyn-item" jplist="data-jplist-item"><table> <tbody><tr class="pr"><td class="pct" data-label="Date"><div class="pc">Tue 30-Jul-2019</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Ship"><div class="pc">Black Watch</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Departs"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Arrives"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pcpt" data-label="From Price"><div class="cp">£1,399</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td><td class="pct" data-label=""><div class="pc"><label class="popup_label" for="tab-pr0020811-1">More<br />Pricing</label><input class="checker" type="checkbox" id="tab-pr0020811-1" hidden><div class="modal"><div class="modal-body"><div class="modal-content"><table> <tbody><tr class="pph" style="width:100%;"><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">&nbsp;</div></td><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">From</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Inside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£1399.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Outside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£1599.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Balcony</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£3279.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Suite</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£3449.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Single</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">Call For Pricing</div><div class="st"> </div></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div class="modal-footer"><label for="tab-pr0020811-1">close</label></div></div></div></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div></div>

Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines

Current Promotions

Expand for more information

New Cruise Programme

We’re delighted to announce the launch of Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines’ new 2021/22 itineraries, designed to not only allow you to explore the world, but experience it too. Travel with Fred. Olsen worldwide to over 200 destinations – including 13 maiden calls – and nearly 100 areas of scenic cruising across 86 countries.

As Fred. Olsen's ships are smaller, they can take you on the finest cruises in the world, to places out of reach to larger vessels, and much closer to the heart of the destination. Immerse yourself in the rich culture of the Americas or beauty of New Zealand; sail Greece’s Corinth Canal, French and Spanish rivers, or explore Norway’s glorious fjordland; experience Venice Carnival or a night at the Russian ballet in St Petersburg; discover paradise in the Caribbean; and much more.

Book any 2021 or 2022 cruise by 5th May 2020 and you’ll benefit from: the following:

  • Choose your cabin
  • Choose your restaurant and dining time (book extra early to guarantee this one as dining places are limited!)
  • Low deposit – just 15%
  • Priority booking for Shore Tours
  • Priority on board arrival and departure
  • Free shuttle bus to local centre (where operating)

PLUS, ALL Tips included*

We’ll take care of your Tips for the Cabin Stewardess and Waiter for the duration of your cruise.

PLUS, at least £50 per person to spend on board*

Book now and we’ll arrange a minimum of £50 per person FREE On Board Spend to be waiting in your cabin account when you get on board

On Sale:

Wednesday 4th March 2020 – Diamond Elite, Platinum, & Gold Oceans members.
Thursday 5th March 2020 – Silver Oceans members;
Friday 6th March 2020 – Bronze Oceans members;
Monday 9th March 2020 – general on sale date.

*Terms and conditions apply – see the Campaign Terms for full details.

Brexit Promise.

We’re so confident that Brexit won’t affect your Fred. Olsen cruise, should the cruise be cancelled due to the UK leaving the EU, we will give you a full refund and a free cruise. What’s more, once a cruise has been booked and the deposit paid, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines also promises that there will be no additional supplements or surcharges directly related to Brexit, on the confirmed price. There is the security of ABTA and ATOL protection and our Enjoyment Promise giving real peace of mind. Plus Shore Tours and purchases on board our ships are priced in Pounds Sterling – so you can explore the world without worrying about exchange rates. With 170 years of sailing heritage behind us we’ve seen many changes over the years, but what has never changed is our focus on giving guests the best possible experience, wherever and whenever they sail with us. With Fred. Olsen you can always book with confidence.

*Terms and conditions apply – see the Campaign Terms for full details. Exclusions apply.

Itinerary

Day 1 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

Day 4 - Reykjavík

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Day 5 - Reykjavík

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Day 7 - Cruising Prins Christian Sund

Day 7 - Cruising Torssukatak

Day 8 - Qaqortoq (Julianehaab)

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it's easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.

Day 9 - Narsarsuaq

Day 9 - Cruising Tunulliarfik Fjord

Day 10 - Nanortalik

Nanortalik lies in a scenic area surrounded by steep mountainsides and is Greenland's tenth-largest and most southerly town with less than 1500 inhabitants. The town's name means the "place of polar bears

Day 10 - Cruising Tasermiut Fjord

Day 14 - Belfast

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste (%5C"sandbank ford%5C") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion-its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans-who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics-Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname %5C"Titanic Town.%5C" Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about %5C"the Troubles.%5C" Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall-and even the glorious Crown Bar-spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

Day 15 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

What's Included

  • Onboard Accommodation
  • All meals Included
  • Entertainment and activities
  • Onboard enrichment
  • ABTA and ATOL bonded for your financIal protection

What's Not Included

  • Shore excursions
  • Drinks
  • Speciality dining
  • Laundry concierge

Enquire

<select id="Date" name="Date" data-name="Date" class="inputtext w-select"> <option value="">Select one...</option><option value="Tue 30-Jul-2019">Tue 30-Jul-2019</option></select>
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Black Watch

Sister ship of Boudicca, Black Watch was first launched in 1972 and fully refit at the end of 2016. Offering a traditional cruising experience, she welcomes up to 804 passengers across her 8 decks. 

Black Watch is sleek, intimate and harks back to the days when cruise ships were revered for their style and charm. Focusing on providing a traditional cruise experience rather than gimmicks such as climbing walls and on board bumper cars, Black Watch feels friendly and familiar. This is further enhanced by the attentive staff who strive to offer service with a smile and remember the important things, such as your name and favourite tipple and how your like your eggs cooked at breakfast.

Able to accommodate up to 804 guests, there are a selection of suites and ocean view rooms to choose from, providing ample room and everything you need for a comfortable enjoyable and stress-free stay; and spacious public rooms bathed in natural light and retaining the elegant style of a traditional cruise ship. Black Watch has four restaurants options, including the stylish Glentanar Restaurant and beautiful Orchid Room which has a wonderful oriental look and feel. Before dinner you could delve into a good book in the well-stocked library, relax in the warmth on the Sun Deck, sample a great selection of premium gin at the Marquee Bar, or even devour a premium afternoon tea. Don't miss the extravaganza of music, dance and comedy at evening shows in the Neptune Lounge.

Black Watch sails from ports all around the UK, and thanks to her new Terrace Balcony Rooms, offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy unforgettable sights and experiences as you cruise the world's most spectacular waterways to a string of stunning destinations.

Ship Highlights

On selected cruises, special interest themed excursions are on offer, where a range of activities and entertainment will be provided, regarding a particular point of interest or subject. A guest speaker will talk about their subject and 'Shore Tours' will take place. A 'Shore Tour' is a tour of a particular destination that will help bring to life and give a better understanding of the particular theme/subject that is being taught.

One example is a tour of the wine regions of Bordeaux and Rioja while wine expert Jilly Goolden delivers talks onboard and there is the opportunity to take part in wine-tasting activities and entertainment.

The majority of theme programs are free of charge, however relevant materials and 'Shore Tours' may have an additional cost.

Ship Stats
Staterooms
423
Capacity
804
Accessible
Staterooms
4
Crew
330
Year Launched
1972
Last Refurbishment
2016
Decks
8
Currency
GBP
Gross Tonnage
28613
Length (metres)
205.47
Width (metres)
25.2
Ship Speed (knots)
18
Language on board
en

Additional Information

Itinerary

Day 1 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

Day 4 - Reykjavík

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Day 5 - Reykjavík

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Day 7 - Cruising Prins Christian Sund

Day 7 - Cruising Torssukatak

Day 8 - Qaqortoq (Julianehaab)

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it's easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.

Day 9 - Narsarsuaq

Day 9 - Cruising Tunulliarfik Fjord

Day 10 - Nanortalik

Nanortalik lies in a scenic area surrounded by steep mountainsides and is Greenland's tenth-largest and most southerly town with less than 1500 inhabitants. The town's name means the "place of polar bears

Day 10 - Cruising Tasermiut Fjord

Day 14 - Belfast

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste (%5C"sandbank ford%5C") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion-its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans-who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics-Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname %5C"Titanic Town.%5C" Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about %5C"the Troubles.%5C" Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall-and even the glorious Crown Bar-spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

Day 15 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

What's Included

What's Included

  • Onboard Accommodation
  • All meals Included
  • Entertainment and activities
  • Onboard enrichment
  • ABTA and ATOL bonded for your financIal protection

What's Not Included

  • Shore excursions
  • Drinks
  • Speciality dining
  • Laundry concierge
Don't forget we can tailor-make your perfect holiday with hotels, flights, tours, cruises and more to suit your needs.
Get in touch to discuss your dream holiday with us today.
Pricing
From
To
Departure Point
Arrival Point
From Price
Ship
<div class="ph w-hidden-small w-hidden-tiny w-row" style="width:100%;"><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Date<br></div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Ship</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Departure Point</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Arrival Point</div></div><div class="poc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">From Price</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">&nbsp;</div></div></div><div class="w-dyn-list" style="width:100%;"> <div class="w-dyn-items"> <div class="pricingtable w-dyn-item" jplist="data-jplist-item"><table> <tbody><tr class="pr"><td class="pct" data-label="Date"><div class="pc">Tue 30-Jul-2019</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Ship"><div class="pc">Black Watch</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Departs"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Arrives"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pcpt" data-label="From Price"><div class="cp">£1,399</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td><td class="pct" data-label=""><div class="pc"><label class="popup_label" for="acc-pr0020811-2">More<br />Pricing</label><input class="checker" type="checkbox" id="acc-pr0020811-2" hidden><div class="modal"><div class="modal-body"><div class="modal-content"><table> <tbody><tr class="pph" style="width:100%;"><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">&nbsp;</div></td><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">From</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Inside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£1399.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Outside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£1599.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Balcony</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£3279.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Suite</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£3449.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Single</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£Sold Out</div><div class="st"></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div class="modal-footer"><label for="acc-pr0020811-2">close</label></div></div></div></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div></div>
Enquire
<select id="Date" name="Date" data-name="Date" class="inputtext w-select"> <option value="">Select one...</option><option value="Tue 30-Jul-2019">Tue 30-Jul-2019</option></select>
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Ship Info

Black Watch

Sister ship of Boudicca, Black Watch was first launched in 1972 and fully refit at the end of 2016. Offering a traditional cruising experience, she welcomes up to 804 passengers across her 8 decks. 

Black Watch is sleek, intimate and harks back to the days when cruise ships were revered for their style and charm. Focusing on providing a traditional cruise experience rather than gimmicks such as climbing walls and on board bumper cars, Black Watch feels friendly and familiar. This is further enhanced by the attentive staff who strive to offer service with a smile and remember the important things, such as your name and favourite tipple and how your like your eggs cooked at breakfast.

Able to accommodate up to 804 guests, there are a selection of suites and ocean view rooms to choose from, providing ample room and everything you need for a comfortable enjoyable and stress-free stay; and spacious public rooms bathed in natural light and retaining the elegant style of a traditional cruise ship. Black Watch has four restaurants options, including the stylish Glentanar Restaurant and beautiful Orchid Room which has a wonderful oriental look and feel. Before dinner you could delve into a good book in the well-stocked library, relax in the warmth on the Sun Deck, sample a great selection of premium gin at the Marquee Bar, or even devour a premium afternoon tea. Don't miss the extravaganza of music, dance and comedy at evening shows in the Neptune Lounge.

Black Watch sails from ports all around the UK, and thanks to her new Terrace Balcony Rooms, offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy unforgettable sights and experiences as you cruise the world's most spectacular waterways to a string of stunning destinations.

Ship Highlights

On selected cruises, special interest themed excursions are on offer, where a range of activities and entertainment will be provided, regarding a particular point of interest or subject. A guest speaker will talk about their subject and 'Shore Tours' will take place. A 'Shore Tour' is a tour of a particular destination that will help bring to life and give a better understanding of the particular theme/subject that is being taught.

One example is a tour of the wine regions of Bordeaux and Rioja while wine expert Jilly Goolden delivers talks onboard and there is the opportunity to take part in wine-tasting activities and entertainment.

The majority of theme programs are free of charge, however relevant materials and 'Shore Tours' may have an additional cost.

Ship Stats
Staterooms
423
Capacity
804
Accessible
Staterooms
4
Crew
330
Year Launched
1972
Last Refurbishment
2016
Decks
8
Currency
GBP
Gross Tonnage
28613
Length (metres)
205.47
Width (metres)
25.2
Ship Speed (knots)
18
Language on board
en
Additional Info
Don't forget we can tailor-make your perfect holiday with hotels, flights, tours, cruises and more to suit your needs.
Get in touch to discuss your dream holiday with us today.
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Read our latest blog
29th June 2020

Ensuring a Safe, Healthy and Enjoyable cruise

As the world of travel begins to resume, the cruise industry is making plans and are working with federal governments and Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) on rigorous new safety and sanitation protocols to protect passengers and crew when they can resume sailing.
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Read our testimonials
16th March 2020

We Enjoyed Our Trip Immensely

We enjoyed our trip immensely, everything went according to the itinerary.
Vivienne Burfitt
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Reasons to book with us...

Financial protection afforded by our ABTA and ATOL industry bonding, giving you complete peace of mind.

‍Dedicated team of experienced travel advisors waiting to tailor your holiday to your personal requirements.

Choose from thousands of destinations and travel styles to suit you.

We can arrange all of your car hire, airport lounges and much more to make your holiday as easy as possible.

Bonded by the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) and by the Civil Aviation Authority's Air Travel Organisers Licensing (ATOL) scheme, you can look forward to your next adventure with the peace of mind that your money is financially protected in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

Contact Information

If you would like to make, or have any questions regarding a booking, please contact us on:

0800 256 4519

Monday - Friday: 9am - 5.30pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm

© Fred. Olsen Travel

Registered in England and Wales No. 02287241. Olympus House, 2 Olympus Close, Ipswich, IP1 5LN