Liverpool
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Liverpool
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Black Watch
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32
nights
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£3,699
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Manager's Pick

Idyllic Islands of the Caribbean

  • Traditional cruising
  • Small and friendly
  • Couples cruising

Pricing

<div class="ph w-hidden-small w-hidden-tiny w-row" style="width:100%;"><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Date<br></div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Ship</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Departure Point</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Arrival Point</div></div><div class="poc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">From Price</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">&nbsp;</div></div></div><div class="w-dyn-list" style="width:100%;"> <div class="w-dyn-items"> <div class="pricingtable w-dyn-item" jplist="data-jplist-item"><table> <tbody><tr class="pr"><td class="pct" data-label="Date"><div class="pc">Fri 06-Nov-2020</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Ship"><div class="pc">Black Watch</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Departs"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Arrives"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pcpt" data-label="From Price"><div class="cp">£3,699</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td><td class="pct" data-label=""><div class="pc"><label class="popup_label" for="tab-pr0020831-1">More<br />Pricing</label><input class="checker" type="checkbox" id="tab-pr0020831-1" hidden><div class="modal"><div class="modal-body"><div class="modal-content"><table> <tbody><tr class="pph" style="width:100%;"><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">&nbsp;</div></td><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">From</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Inside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£3699.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Outside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£3999.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Balcony</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£5899.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Suite</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">£6099.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="pr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Single</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc">Call For Pricing</div><div class="st"> </div></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div class="modal-footer"><label for="tab-pr0020831-1">close</label></div></div></div></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div></div>

Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines

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Cruise Sale - Free Drinks and Tips

Sailing the world with Fred. Olsen is now even better value with our Cruise Sale offers, available on a wide range of 2020 cruise holidays – starting from just £599 per person.

Plus, you’ll benefit from FREE Drinks & Tips on over 100 incredible sailings. Soak-up the serene surroundings and outstanding beauty on a Norwegian Fjord adventure. Uncover authentic cultures, flavours and landmarks of Andalusia; sail gorgeous rivers and waterways of Spain or France; or even discover paradise in the Caribbean, Asia or Africa

Book now and you’ll enjoy selected house wines by the glass, selected beers, spirits and soft drinks throughout your holiday, all without having to pay a penny more. We’ll also cover your tips too!

Journey to the Top of the World

A 28-night arctic exploration specially timed to capture the seasonal highlights

We are very excited to unveil this brand new sailing from the yet-to-be-launched 2021 programme. In one sailing, you'll be able to visit remote destinations in Norway, Svalbard, Iceland and Greenland. Along the way, you'll benefit from Boudicca's size advantage by sailing waterways out of reach to the larger vessels.

Dramatic landscapes that have beckoned visitors from around the world await you on this fantastic expedition. Vistas of unparalleled beauty are set amidst waters bursting with marine and birdlife. From Norway's wonderland of mighty waterfalls, rolling valleys and chocolate box towns to Iceland's fascinating Viking history and remarkable wildlife. From Svalbard's peaks, glaciers, and vast ice fields to Greenland's dramatic fjords, imposing mountains and majestic icebergs – you'll discover a whole other world in each port you visit… This memorable cruise adventure is specially created to show you all the wild and wonderful highlights of these distinct nations but in the renowned comfort of a Fred. Olsen ship.

Every step of the way your ship will take the most scenic routes, such as passing the pointed peaks of the impressive Seven Sisters mountain range; by the North Cape plateau, with its steep cliff face jutting out into the sea; through Prins Christiansund, which has been ranked by Fred. Olsen guests as our best scenic cruising experience; and along the Tasermiut Fjord, considered one of the ten wonders of the Arctic. This 28-night voyage is several wish-list holidays all rolled into one, unforgettable Fred. Olsen cruise.

A CHANCE TO SEEK OUT REMARKABLE NATURAL PHENOMENA.

At Fred. Olsen, we share your desire for exploring the world – a passion that has inspired many rare sailing achievements over the years. This unique cruise on board Boudicca for August 2021 is intended to be among them. Heading off the beaten track, we’ll aim to combine the last glimpse of the Midnight Sun – where the sun stays above the horizon for an astonishing 24-hours – with early glimmers of the Northern Lights, afforded by an overnight stay in Akureyri and a stop in Ísafjörður. As with all ventures of this kind, we’ll need nature to be on our side – but that’s exactly what makes it so exciting. We hope you’ll join us.

On Sale Dates

Gold, Platinum & Diamond Elite members – Tuesday 19th November 2019 at 8 a.m.
Silver members – Wednesday 20th November 2019
Bronze members – Thursday 21st November 2019
General on sale date – Monday 25th November 2019

Exploring the Arctic with the Midnight Sun

Sunday 14th August 2021
28 Nights
Sailing from Dover
On board Boudicca

Brand New Sailing – On Sale NOW!

Experience a breath-taking transit of the 6.4-kilometre-long Corinth Canal, with this ever popular itinerary.

Award winning for their incredible itineraries, Fred Olsen made history in October 2019 when Braemar broke the existing record of becoming the largest ship ever to transverse this famous feat of engineering, and now you can experience this incredible itinerary.

This spectacular itinerary has been specially crafted to present you with some of the most unique and authentic sights and experiences Greece has to offer and features an extensive array of highlights; Cultural gems, ancient archaeological treasures and picture perfect scenery.

And, as if that wasn’t enough, elegant Braemar will guide you on a record-breaking, simply unforgettable sailing of the impressive Corinth Canal too.

Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines are committed to making sure that every Fred. Olsen cruise is an enjoyable, engaging and memorable experience, and with their smaller cruise vessels, they can take you closer to some of greatest destinations on earth.

This will be a holiday that you will never forget.

On Sale Dates

Gold, Platinum & Diamond Elite members – Tuesday 12 November 2019
Silver members – Wednesday 13 November 2019
Bronze members – Thursday 14 November 2019
General on sale date – Monday 18 November 2019

Corinth Canal & Greek Island

23 September 2022
25 Nights
Sailing from Southampton
On board Braemar
Southampton - Malaga, Andalusia, Spain - Valletta, Malta - Agios Nikolaos, Crete, Greece - Rhodes, Greece - Ermoupoli, Syros, Greece - Cruising Corinth Canal - Patras, Greece - Katakolon, Greece - Argostoli, Kefallonia, Greece - Cruising Strait of Messina - Cruising by Stromboli - Trapani, Sicily, Italy - Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain - Cartagena, Spain - Lisbon, Portugal – Southampton

Brexit Promise.

We’re so confident that Brexit won’t affect your Fred. Olsen cruise, should the cruise be cancelled due to the UK leaving the EU, we will give you a full refund and a free cruise. What’s more, once a cruise has been booked and the deposit paid, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines also promises that there will be no additional supplements or surcharges directly related to Brexit, on the confirmed price. There is the security of ABTA and ATOL protection and our Enjoyment Promise giving real peace of mind. Plus Shore Tours and purchases on board our ships are priced in Pounds Sterling – so you can explore the world without worrying about exchange rates. With 170 years of sailing heritage behind us we’ve seen many changes over the years, but what has never changed is our focus on giving guests the best possible experience, wherever and whenever they sail with us. With Fred. Olsen you can always book with confidence.

*Terms and conditions apply – see the Campaign Terms for full details. Exclusions apply.

Itinerary

Day 1 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

Day 4 - Lisbon

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 6 - Funchal Madeira

Formed by a volcanic eruption, Madeira lies in the Gulf Stream, about 500 miles due west of Casablanca. Discovered by Portuguese explorer João Gonçalves Zarco in 1419, this beautiful island became part of Portugal's vast empire and was named for the dense forest which cloaked it - 'Madeira' means 'wood' in Portuguese. Sugar plantations first brought wealth here, and when King Charles II of England granted an exclusive franchise to sell wine to England and its colonies, many British emigrants were drawn to the capital, Funchal. Today's travellers come to Madeira for the varied and luxuriant scenery, from mountain slopes covered with vines to picturesque villages and a profusion of wild flowers. The natural beauty of the island has earned it many pseudonyms such as 'The Floating Garden of the Atlantic', 'The Island of Eternal Springtime' and 'God's Botanical Gardens' and our selection of excursions aim to show you why.

Day 13 - Bridgetown

Located beside the island's only natural harbour, the capital of Barbados combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 14 - Castries

The typical image of a lush tropical paradise comes to life on the friendly island of St Lucia. Despite its small size - just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide - St Lucia is rich in natural splendour with dense emerald rainforest, banana plantations and orchards of coconut, mango and papaya trees. The twin peaks of Les Pitons, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site rise dramatically 2,000 feet into the sky and dominate the island. Look out for unusual birds with brilliant plumage such as the St Lucia parrot, see a surprising diversity of exotic flora and enjoy the warm hospitality of the islanders in the small villages and open-air markets. Please be aware that St Lucia is a small, mountainous island, with steep, winding and bumpy roads. Customers with back and neck problems should take this into consideration when booking an excursion.

Day 14 - Cruising by Pitons

Day 15 - Mayreau Island

The small island of Mayreau, just one and 1/2 square miles in area (3.9 square kilometres) is the smallest inhabited island of The Grenadines, and is part of the independent state of St.Vincent in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Two of the best known islands in The Grenadines are Mustique and Bequia, the second largest island in this group. The Grenadine Islands are strung out in a gentle sweep between St.Vincent and Grenada. Most visitors to Mayreau arrive from cruise ships, on the regular ferry, or by yacht. There are no proper roads on the island, only a few vehicles, no airport and only a single unnamed village. Mayreau and the neighboring Tobago Cays are very popular for divers and snorkellers. Saline Bay, on the west coast of the island, has a wonderful broad beach and a few local vendors selling T-shirts and local craft. A climb up the road to the hilltop village on the island provides breathtaking views across Mayreau, Canouan, the Tobago Cays and Carriacou.

Day 15 - Saint George's

Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.

Day 16 - Saint George's

Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.

Day 17 - Port Elizabeth Bequia

Bequia is a Carib word meaning %5C"island of the cloud.%5C" Hilly and green with several golden-sand beaches, Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent's southwestern shore; with a population of 5,000, it's the largest of the Grenadines. Although boatbuilding, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing has now become almost synonymous with Bequia. Admiralty Bay is a favored anchorage for both privately owned and chartered yachts. Lodgings range from comfortable resorts and villas to cozy West Indian-style inns. Bequia's airport and the frequent ferry service from St. Vincent make this a favorite destination for day-trippers, as well. The ferry docks in Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs-including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats that are a famous Bequia export. The Easter Regatta is held during the four-day Easter weekend, when revelers gather to watch boat races and celebrate the island's seafaring traditions with food, music, dancing, and competitive games.To see the views, villages, beaches, and boatbuilding sites around Bequia, hire a taxi at the jetty in Port Elizabeth. Several usually line up under the almond trees to meet each ferry from St. Vincent.

Day 18 - Fort-de-France

The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.

Day 19 - Pointe-à-Pitre

This warm city is located in Guadeloupe and offers a choice of activities and places to visit for all the family. From markets to educational theme parks, children and adults alike will find something to entertain them.

Day 20 - Basseterre Saint Kitts

Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.

Day 21 - Saint John's

With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John's has been the administrative capital since the island's colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.

Day 28 - Ponta Delgada Azores

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Day 29 - Ponta Delgada Azores

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Day 33 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

What's Included

  • Onboard Accommodation
  • All meals Included
  • Entertainment and activities
  • Onboard enrichment
  • ABTA and ATOL bonded for your financIal protection

What's Not Included

  • Shore excursions
  • Drinks
  • Speciality dining
  • Laundry concierge

Enquire

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Black Watch

Sister ship of Boudicca, Black Watch was first launched in 1972 and fully refit at the end of 2016. Offering a traditional cruising experience, she welcomes up to 804 passengers across her 8 decks. 

Black Watch is sleek, intimate and harks back to the days when cruise ships were revered for their style and charm. Focusing on providing a traditional cruise experience rather than gimmicks such as climbing walls and on board bumper cars, Black Watch feels friendly and familiar. This is further enhanced by the attentive staff who strive to offer service with a smile and remember the important things, such as your name and favourite tipple and how your like your eggs cooked at breakfast.

Able to accommodate up to 804 guests, there are a selection of suites and ocean view rooms to choose from, providing ample room and everything you need for a comfortable enjoyable and stress-free stay; and spacious public rooms bathed in natural light and retaining the elegant style of a traditional cruise ship. Black Watch has four restaurants options, including the stylish Glentanar Restaurant and beautiful Orchid Room which has a wonderful oriental look and feel. Before dinner you could delve into a good book in the well-stocked library, relax in the warmth on the Sun Deck, sample a great selection of premium gin at the Marquee Bar, or even devour a premium afternoon tea. Don't miss the extravaganza of music, dance and comedy at evening shows in the Neptune Lounge.

Black Watch sails from ports all around the UK, and thanks to her new Terrace Balcony Rooms, offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy unforgettable sights and experiences as you cruise the world's most spectacular waterways to a string of stunning destinations.

Ship Highlights

On selected cruises, special interest themed excursions are on offer, where a range of activities and entertainment will be provided, regarding a particular point of interest or subject. A guest speaker will talk about their subject and 'Shore Tours' will take place. A 'Shore Tour' is a tour of a particular destination that will help bring to life and give a better understanding of the particular theme/subject that is being taught.

One example is a tour of the wine regions of Bordeaux and Rioja while wine expert Jilly Goolden delivers talks onboard and there is the opportunity to take part in wine-tasting activities and entertainment.

The majority of theme programs are free of charge, however relevant materials and 'Shore Tours' may have an additional cost.

Ship Stats
Staterooms
423
Capacity
804
Accessible
Staterooms
4
Crew
330
Year Launched
1972
Last Refurbishment
2016
Decks
8
Currency
GBP
Gross Tonnage
28613
Length (metres)
205.47
Width (metres)
25.2
Ship Speed (knots)
18
Language on board
en

Additional Information

Itinerary

Day 1 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

Day 4 - Lisbon

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 6 - Funchal Madeira

Formed by a volcanic eruption, Madeira lies in the Gulf Stream, about 500 miles due west of Casablanca. Discovered by Portuguese explorer João Gonçalves Zarco in 1419, this beautiful island became part of Portugal's vast empire and was named for the dense forest which cloaked it - 'Madeira' means 'wood' in Portuguese. Sugar plantations first brought wealth here, and when King Charles II of England granted an exclusive franchise to sell wine to England and its colonies, many British emigrants were drawn to the capital, Funchal. Today's travellers come to Madeira for the varied and luxuriant scenery, from mountain slopes covered with vines to picturesque villages and a profusion of wild flowers. The natural beauty of the island has earned it many pseudonyms such as 'The Floating Garden of the Atlantic', 'The Island of Eternal Springtime' and 'God's Botanical Gardens' and our selection of excursions aim to show you why.

Day 13 - Bridgetown

Located beside the island's only natural harbour, the capital of Barbados combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 14 - Castries

The typical image of a lush tropical paradise comes to life on the friendly island of St Lucia. Despite its small size - just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide - St Lucia is rich in natural splendour with dense emerald rainforest, banana plantations and orchards of coconut, mango and papaya trees. The twin peaks of Les Pitons, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site rise dramatically 2,000 feet into the sky and dominate the island. Look out for unusual birds with brilliant plumage such as the St Lucia parrot, see a surprising diversity of exotic flora and enjoy the warm hospitality of the islanders in the small villages and open-air markets. Please be aware that St Lucia is a small, mountainous island, with steep, winding and bumpy roads. Customers with back and neck problems should take this into consideration when booking an excursion.

Day 14 - Cruising by Pitons

Day 15 - Mayreau Island

The small island of Mayreau, just one and 1/2 square miles in area (3.9 square kilometres) is the smallest inhabited island of The Grenadines, and is part of the independent state of St.Vincent in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Two of the best known islands in The Grenadines are Mustique and Bequia, the second largest island in this group. The Grenadine Islands are strung out in a gentle sweep between St.Vincent and Grenada. Most visitors to Mayreau arrive from cruise ships, on the regular ferry, or by yacht. There are no proper roads on the island, only a few vehicles, no airport and only a single unnamed village. Mayreau and the neighboring Tobago Cays are very popular for divers and snorkellers. Saline Bay, on the west coast of the island, has a wonderful broad beach and a few local vendors selling T-shirts and local craft. A climb up the road to the hilltop village on the island provides breathtaking views across Mayreau, Canouan, the Tobago Cays and Carriacou.

Day 15 - Saint George's

Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.

Day 16 - Saint George's

Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.

Day 17 - Port Elizabeth Bequia

Bequia is a Carib word meaning %5C"island of the cloud.%5C" Hilly and green with several golden-sand beaches, Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent's southwestern shore; with a population of 5,000, it's the largest of the Grenadines. Although boatbuilding, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing has now become almost synonymous with Bequia. Admiralty Bay is a favored anchorage for both privately owned and chartered yachts. Lodgings range from comfortable resorts and villas to cozy West Indian-style inns. Bequia's airport and the frequent ferry service from St. Vincent make this a favorite destination for day-trippers, as well. The ferry docks in Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs-including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats that are a famous Bequia export. The Easter Regatta is held during the four-day Easter weekend, when revelers gather to watch boat races and celebrate the island's seafaring traditions with food, music, dancing, and competitive games.To see the views, villages, beaches, and boatbuilding sites around Bequia, hire a taxi at the jetty in Port Elizabeth. Several usually line up under the almond trees to meet each ferry from St. Vincent.

Day 18 - Fort-de-France

The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.

Day 19 - Pointe-à-Pitre

This warm city is located in Guadeloupe and offers a choice of activities and places to visit for all the family. From markets to educational theme parks, children and adults alike will find something to entertain them.

Day 20 - Basseterre Saint Kitts

Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.

Day 21 - Saint John's

With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John's has been the administrative capital since the island's colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.

Day 28 - Ponta Delgada Azores

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Day 29 - Ponta Delgada Azores

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Day 33 - Liverpool

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

What's Included

What's Included

  • Onboard Accommodation
  • All meals Included
  • Entertainment and activities
  • Onboard enrichment
  • ABTA and ATOL bonded for your financIal protection

What's Not Included

  • Shore excursions
  • Drinks
  • Speciality dining
  • Laundry concierge
Don't forget we can tailor-make your perfect holiday with hotels, flights, tours, cruises and more to suit your needs.
Get in touch to discuss your dream holiday with us today.
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<div class="ph w-hidden-small w-hidden-tiny w-row" style="width:100%;"><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Date<br></div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Ship</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Departure Point</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pch">Arrival Point</div></div><div class="poc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">From Price</div></div><div class="phc w-col w-col-2"><div class="pcph">&nbsp;</div></div></div><div class="w-dyn-list" style="width:100%;"> <div class="w-dyn-items"> <div class="pricingtable w-dyn-item" jplist="data-jplist-item"><table> <tbody><tr class="pr"><td class="pct" data-label="Date"><div class="pc">Fri 06-Nov-2020</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Ship"><div class="pc">Black Watch</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Departs"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pct" data-label="Arrives"><div class="pc">Liverpool</div></td><td class="pcpt" data-label="From Price"><div class="cp">£3,699</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td><td class="pct" data-label=""><div class="pc"><label class="popup_label" for="acc-pr0020831-2">More<br />Pricing</label><input class="checker" type="checkbox" id="acc-pr0020831-2" hidden><div class="modal"><div class="modal-body"><div class="modal-content"><table> <tbody><tr class="pph" style="width:100%;"><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">&nbsp;</div></td><td class="pphc"><div class="pch">From</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Inside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£3699.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Outside</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£3999.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Balcony</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£5899.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Suite</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£6099.00</div><div class="st">Per Person</div></td></tr><tr class="ppr"><td class="ppcpt"><div class="cp">Single</div></td><td class="ppct"><div class="pc" style="text-decoration: line-through;">£Sold Out</div><div class="st"></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div class="modal-footer"><label for="acc-pr0020831-2">close</label></div></div></div></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div></div>
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Ship Info

Black Watch

Sister ship of Boudicca, Black Watch was first launched in 1972 and fully refit at the end of 2016. Offering a traditional cruising experience, she welcomes up to 804 passengers across her 8 decks. 

Black Watch is sleek, intimate and harks back to the days when cruise ships were revered for their style and charm. Focusing on providing a traditional cruise experience rather than gimmicks such as climbing walls and on board bumper cars, Black Watch feels friendly and familiar. This is further enhanced by the attentive staff who strive to offer service with a smile and remember the important things, such as your name and favourite tipple and how your like your eggs cooked at breakfast.

Able to accommodate up to 804 guests, there are a selection of suites and ocean view rooms to choose from, providing ample room and everything you need for a comfortable enjoyable and stress-free stay; and spacious public rooms bathed in natural light and retaining the elegant style of a traditional cruise ship. Black Watch has four restaurants options, including the stylish Glentanar Restaurant and beautiful Orchid Room which has a wonderful oriental look and feel. Before dinner you could delve into a good book in the well-stocked library, relax in the warmth on the Sun Deck, sample a great selection of premium gin at the Marquee Bar, or even devour a premium afternoon tea. Don't miss the extravaganza of music, dance and comedy at evening shows in the Neptune Lounge.

Black Watch sails from ports all around the UK, and thanks to her new Terrace Balcony Rooms, offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy unforgettable sights and experiences as you cruise the world's most spectacular waterways to a string of stunning destinations.

Ship Highlights

On selected cruises, special interest themed excursions are on offer, where a range of activities and entertainment will be provided, regarding a particular point of interest or subject. A guest speaker will talk about their subject and 'Shore Tours' will take place. A 'Shore Tour' is a tour of a particular destination that will help bring to life and give a better understanding of the particular theme/subject that is being taught.

One example is a tour of the wine regions of Bordeaux and Rioja while wine expert Jilly Goolden delivers talks onboard and there is the opportunity to take part in wine-tasting activities and entertainment.

The majority of theme programs are free of charge, however relevant materials and 'Shore Tours' may have an additional cost.

Ship Stats
Staterooms
423
Capacity
804
Accessible
Staterooms
4
Crew
330
Year Launched
1972
Last Refurbishment
2016
Decks
8
Currency
GBP
Gross Tonnage
28613
Length (metres)
205.47
Width (metres)
25.2
Ship Speed (knots)
18
Language on board
en
Additional Info
Don't forget we can tailor-make your perfect holiday with hotels, flights, tours, cruises and more to suit your needs.
Get in touch to discuss your dream holiday with us today.
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4th December 2019

Celebrating Christmas In Estonia

When visiting Estonia during the Christmas period, you’ll notice there’s a mix of traditional elements and modern twists. Snowflakes fall creating a blanket above the buildings, stringed lights are illuminated and warm mulled wine is passed around.
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7th October 2019

A Quick Thank You

Just a quick message to thank you both very much for all your patience, time, help and support with booking our holiday for next year.
Mr and Mrs Beales
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Financial protection afforded by our ABTA and ATOL industry bonding, giving you complete peace of mind.

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Choose from thousands of destinations and travel styles to suit you.

We can arrange all of your car hire, airport lounges and much more to make your holiday as easy as possible.

Bonded by the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) and by the Civil Aviation Authority's Air Travel Organisers Licensing (ATOL) scheme, you can look forward to your next adventure with the peace of mind that your money is financially protected in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

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